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Endemic Animals of Puerto Rico

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Endemic Animals of Puerto Rico

Common coquí


The common coquí or coquí (Eleutherodactylus coqui ) is a species of frog endemic to Puerto Rico belonging to the family Eleutherodactylidae. The species is named for the loud call the males make at night. This sound serves two purposes. «CO» serves to repel other males and establish territory while the «KEE» serves to attract females. Since the auditory systems of males and females respond preferentially to different notes of the male call, t …
his is an example of a sex difference in a sensory system. The common coquí is a very important aspect of Puerto Rican culture, and it has become an unofficial territorial symbol of Puerto Rico.
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Puerto Rican amazon


The Puerto Rican amazon (Amazona vittata ), also known as the Puerto Rican parrot (Puerto Rican Spanish: cotorra puertorriqueña ) or iguaca, is the only extant parrot endemic to the archipelago of Puerto Rico, and belongs to the Neotropical genus Amazona. Measuring 28–30 cm (11.0–11.8 in), the bird is a predominantly green parrot with a red forehead and white rings around the eyes. Its closest relatives are believed to be the Cuban amazon (Amazo …
na leucocephala ) and the Hispaniolan amazon (Amazona ventralis ).The Puerto Rican amazon reaches sexual maturity at between three and four years of age. It reproduces once a year and is a cavity nester. Once the female lays eggs she will remain in the nest and continuously incubate them until hatching. The chicks are fed by both parents and will fledge 60 to 65 days after hatching. This parrot’s diet is varied and consists of flowers, fruits, leaves, bark and nectar obtained from the forest canopy.The species is the only remaining native parrot to Puerto Rico and has been listed as critically endangered by the World Conservation Union since 1994. Once widespread and abundant, the population declined drastically in the 19th and early 20th centuries with the removal of most of its native habitat; the species has completely vanished from Vieques and Mona Island. Conservation efforts commenced in 1968 to save the bird from extinction.
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Puerto Rican spindalis


The Puerto Rican spindalis (Spindalis portoricensis ) is a bird endemic to the island of Puerto Rico, where it is commonly known as reina mora. The species is widely distributed throughout the island and is an important part of the Puerto Rican ecosystem because of its help in seed dispersal and plant reproduction. The Puerto Rican spindalis is the unofficial national bird of Puerto Rico.
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Yellow-shouldered blackbird


The yellow-shouldered blackbird (Agelaius xanthomus ), known in Puerto Rican Spanish as mariquita de Puerto Rico or capitán, is a species of blackbird endemic to Puerto Rico. It has black plumage with a prominent yellow patch on the wing. Adult males and females are of similar appearance. The species is predominantly insectivorous.
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Puerto Rican boa


The Puerto Rican boa (Chilabothrus inornatus ) is a large species of boa endemic to Puerto Rico. It is a terrestrial snake with a dark brown coloration. It grows to 1.9 m (6.2 ft) in length. It feeds on small mammals such as rodents and bats, birds and sometimes anole lizards. Like all boas, it is viviparous (bearing live young) and kills its prey using constriction.
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Mona ground iguana


The Mona ground iguana (Cyclura stejnegeri ) is a rock iguana that is endemic to Mona Island, Puerto Rico, and is the largest native terrestrial lizard in Puerto Rico. It was previously considered a subspecies of the rhinoceros iguana (Cyclura cornuta ).
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Green mango


The green mango (Anthracothorax viridis ) is a large species of hummingbird in the subfamily Polytminae. It is endemic to the main island of Puerto Rico.
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Puerto Rican nightjar


The Puerto Rican nightjar or Puerto Rican Whip-poor-will (Antrostomus noctitherus ) is a bird in the nightjar family found in the coastal dry scrub forests in localized areas of southwestern Puerto Rico. It was described in 1916 from bones found in a cave in north central Puerto Rico and a single skin specimen from 1888, and was considered extinct until observed in the wild in 1961. The current population is estimated as 1,400-2,000 mature …
birds. The species is currently classified as Endangered due to pressures from habitat loss.
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Puerto Rican emerald


The Puerto Rican emerald (Riccordia maugeaus ), or zumbadorcito de Puerto Rico in Spanish, is an endemic hummingbird found only in the archipelago of Puerto Rico.The species displays sexual dimorphism with males and females differing in coloration. The male has iridescent green feathers on its body and a black tail while the female has a white breast and white out tail feathers. They measure 9-10 cm and weigh about 3 grams. The species is found …
mainly in mountainous regions of Puerto Rico but also occurs along the southwest coast of the main island. Puerto Rican emeralds are highly territorial, often defending territories with intense aerial pursuits. Puerto Rican emeralds use their long pointed bills and long tubular tongues to probe for insects, spiders and nectar, being especially attracted to red flowers. They can breed year-round but breeding is concentrated before the wet season starts from February to May. The female lays two tiny white eggs (measuring 8–13 mm) in a nest cup made of grasses and twigs. The male plays no part in the nesting process.This species was formerly placed in the genus Chlorostilbon. A molecular phylogenetic study published in 2014 found that the genus Chlorostilbon was polyphyletic. In the revised classification to create monophyletic genera the Puerto Rican emerald was moved to the resurrected genus Riccordia.
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Puerto Rican parakeet


The Puerto Rican parakeet or Puerto Rican conure (Psittacara maugei ) is an extinct species of parrot that was found on Mona Island and possibly in Puerto Rico.
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Puerto Rican tanager


The Puerto Rican tanager (Nesospingus speculiferus ) is a small passerine bird endemic to the archipelago of Puerto Rico. It is the only member of the genus Nesospingus and has historically been placed in the tanager family, but recent studies indicate it as either belonging in its own family Nesospingidae or as being a member of Phaenicophilidae. Its closest relatives are likely the spindalises (family Spindalidae, sometimes also considered a …
member of the Phaenicophilidae). The Puerto Rican tanager is known to locals as llorosa, which means ‘cryer’.
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Puerto Rican vireo


The Puerto Rican vireo (Vireo latimeri ) is a small bird endemic to the archipelago of Puerto Rico and one of the 31 species belonging to the genus Vireo of the family Vireonidae. Its local name is bien-te-veo («see-you-well», after the call), not to be confused with the unrelated great kiskadee — also known as bien-te-veo — which is found elsewhere.The Puerto Rican vireo has a gray head, a white breast and a yellowish belly. The species …
measures, on average, 12 cm (4. 72 in) and weighs from 11 to 12 grams (0.388–0.423 oz).An insectivore, the species’s diet consists of grasshoppers, caterpillars, cicadas, beetles and aphids and is complemented with spiders, anoles, and berries.From 1973 until at least 1996, the species suffered a population decline in the Guánica State Forest. The primary reason for this decline was brood parasitism by the shiny cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis ).
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Puerto Rican tody


The Puerto Rican tody (Todus mexicanus ) is a bird endemic to Puerto Rico. It is locally known in Spanish as «San Pedrito» («little Saint Peter») and «medio peso» («half-dollar bird»).
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Elfin woods warbler


The elfin woods warbler (Setophaga angelae ) is a species of bird endemic to Puerto Rico, where it is local and uncommon. Discovered in 1968 and described in 1972, it is the most recently described New World warbler (family Parulidae). The species name, angelae, is a tribute to Angela Kepler, one of its discoverers. These birds are insectivores, as they feed by gleaning small insects off the habitat leaves.Due to its small populations and …
restricted habitats, conservation efforts were begun in 1982 to protect this species, but as of 2005, the warbler was still in need of protection. The species is not in immediate danger as the majority of its habitat is protected forest, but introduced species (such as rats and small Asian mongooses), habitat reduction, and natural disasters represent potential threats to the population.
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Puerto Rican owl


The Puerto Rican owl (Gymnasio nudipes ) or múcaro común (Spanish via Taino), formerly known as the Puerto Rican screech owl, is a mid-sized «typical owl» in subfamily Striginae. It is endemic to the archipelago of Puerto Rico though it formerly also inhabited the Virgin Islands.
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Puerto Rican woodpecker


The Puerto Rican woodpecker (Melanerpes portoricensis ) is the only woodpecker endemic to the archipelago of Puerto Rico and is one of the five species of the genus Melanerpes that occur in the Antilles. Furthermore, it is the only resident species of the family Picidae in Puerto Rico. The species is common on the main island of Puerto Rico and rare on the island of Vieques.
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Puerto Rican bullfinch


The Puerto Rican bullfinch (Melopyrrha portoricensis ) or comeñame in Spanish, is a small bullfinch tanager endemic to the archipelago of Puerto Rico. These were previously considered Emberizidae.The Puerto Rican bullfinch has black feathers with orange areas above the eyes, around its throat, and underneath the tail’s base. The species measures from 17 to 19 cm and weighs approximately 32 grams.The species can be commonly found in heavy forests th …
roughout Puerto Rico, except on the easternmost tip of the island. It consumes seeds, fruits, insects, and spiders. The nest is spherical, with an entrance on the side. Typically three light green eggs are laid.The presumably extinct St. Kitts bullfinch (M. grandis ), endemic to St. Kitts, was formerly considered a subspecies.DietBullfinches are considered to be mainly frugivorous (and appear to prefer fruit when available) but they also consume other plant and animal material (3)(4). Even though the diet of the nestling bullfinches is unknown, most frugivorous bird species feed large quantities of animal matter to their young, especially during the early portion of the nestling stage (5). In later stages of development, it is likely that the chicks are also fed fruit and insects (5). Because of their behavioral flexibility when it comes to food consumption, foraging methods, and foraging site preferences, they are considered a generalist species (3).Range and DistributionBullfinches are believed to be most common in dense mountain forests but can also be found in lower forests with dense undergrowth, coffee plantations, thick brushy areas, dry coastal thickets, and rarely in mangroves (6) (7). They have also been described as edge or open-canopy species (8). Even though it has a widespread distribution over the island, it is suspected that there has been a reduction in range and overall population (7). Breeding and NestingIt is thought that the main breeding time for the Puerto Rican Bullfinch is from March to June within the subtropical moist forest and subtropical wet and lower montane wet forest (6). Puerto Rican bullfinches seem to nest irregularly throughout the year in the wetter forests of Puerto Rico, where seasonality is much less pronounced. However, in the dry forests of southwestern Puerto Rico, most species restrict their breeding to the spring and early summer rainy season of approximately late April to July. During the dry season from December to April, resources are probably too limiting for birds to successfully rear young in most years (5). Furthermore, it is hypothesized that bullfinches breed opportunistically in the dry forest as well. Therefore it might be possible that bullfinches and other species attempt to breed again during the shorter annual rainy peak in September and October (5).The Puerto Rican Bullfinch has been observed exhibiting cooperative breeding behavior in the Guanica region. The observation consisted of juveniles collecting nesting material along with adults and adding material to nests (5).This species usually nests close to the ground on trees or shrubs (9). All species of the genus “Loxigilla”, which is endemic to the Caribbean, are described as constructing domed or globular nests and laying clutches of 2–3 dull greenish eggs with dark markings (10). The bird builds a spherical structure with woven plants materials and sticks. The inner part is usually lined with pieces of bark. There is a side entrance, but the nest may also be domed or totally enclosed with side-opening. It is placed in tree fork, on tree branch or in tree cavity, but also in shrub or clump of grass (11). From observations, it is thought that the female incubates for 14 days. At hatching, the chicks are naked for 3-4 days, after which the flight-feathers start to grow 10 days later and they fledge 14-15 days after hatching (11).Nest predation seems to account for most of the nest failures for the species. In the region of Guanica, was the Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus ) appears to be the most frequent predator. Other possible next predators include the Red-legged Thrushes (Turdus plumbeus ), Puerto Rican racers (Borikenophis portoricensis ), anole lizards (Anolis spp. ) Indian mongoose (Herpestes javanicus ), green iguanas (Iguana iguana ), feral cats (Felis catus ) and black rats (Rattus rattus ) (5). Nets success is believed to be higher when there is more fruit availability, increased precipitation and decreased nest height (5).
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Puerto Rican sharp-shinned hawk


The Puerto Rican sharp-shinned hawk, (Accipiter striatus venator), falcón de sierra or gavilán pecho rufo in Spanish, is an endemic subspecies of the North American sharp-shinned hawk, occurring only in Puerto Rico. Discovered in 1912 and described as a distinct sub-species, it has been placed on the United States Fish and Wildlife Service list of endangered species because of its rapidly dwindling population in Puerto Rico. It can be found in t …
he Toro Negro State Forest.
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Puerto Rican oriole


The Puerto Rican oriole (Icterus portoricensis ) is a species of bird in the family Icteridae, and genus Icterus or New World blackbirds. This species is a part of a subgroup of orioles (Clade A) that includes the North American orchard oriole, Icterus spurius, and the hooded oriole, Icterus cucullatus.The Puerto Rican oriole was previously grouped with Cuban oriole (Icterus melanopsis ), Hispaniolan oriole (Icterus dominicensis ), and Bahama …
oriole (Icterus northropi ) as a single species, (Icterus dominicensis ). In 2010, all four species became recognized as full species by the American Ornithologists’ Union.
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Puerto Rican lizard cuckoo


The Puerto Rican lizard cuckoo (Coccyzus vieilloti ) is a cuckoo endemic to the island of Puerto Rico, and is one of 4 species of lizard-cuckoos which occur only on Caribbean islands. These were formerly placed in the genus Saurothera (Greek for «lizard-eater») of the family Cuculidae, but are now lumped with Coccyzus (AOU 2006).The binomial name of the Puerto Rican lizard cuckoo species commemorates French ornithologist Louis Jean Pierre …
Vieillot.The Puerto Rican lizard cuckoo occurs in forests (common in the Guánica, Guajataca and Vega State Forests and in the Caribbean National Forest) and coffee plantations throughout the island of Puerto Rico. The species can be observed slowly foraging the forest understory for lizards, its main dietary component (approximately 75%). Large spiders and insects are consumed to supplement its diet.Cuckoos are slender birds with long tails and long, thin, slightly curved bills. They move very slowly foraging for prey through the forest. Cuckoos do not swoop or circle in flight but generally fly in a direct line.
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Adelaide’s warbler


Adelaide’s warbler (Setophaga adelaidae ) is a bird endemic to the archipelago of Puerto Rico belonging to the genus Setophaga of the family Parulidae. The species is named after Adelaide Swift, daughter of Robert Swift, the person who captured the first specimen.
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Puerto Rican barn owl


The Puerto Rican barn owl (Tyto cavatica ) is an extinct species of barn owl that inhabited the island of Puerto Rico in the Caribbean. It is sometimes considered to be a subspecies of the ashy-faced owl (Tyto glaucops ).
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Puerto Rican broad-winged hawk


The Puerto Rican broad-winged hawk (Buteo platypterus brunnescens ) is an endangered subspecies of the broad-winged hawk (B. platypterus ). It is a small hawk that occurs in Puerto Rico, inhabiting the Toro Negro State Forest. Its Spanish common name is guaragüao de bosque.
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Golden coquí


The golden coquí is a rare species of frog endemic to Puerto Rico.
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Locust coqui


The locust coqui (Eleutherodactylus locustus ) is a species of frog in the family Eleutherodactylidae endemic to Puerto Rico. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. E. locustus has suffered a population decline of more than 80% due to introduced predators and amphibian chytrid disease. Scientists believe amphibian chytrid disease may be exacerbated by climate …
change — warmer temperatures in dry, moist habitats, causing stress that may lead to greater susceptibility to the disease.
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Eleutherodactylus juanariveroi


Eleutherodactylus juanariveroi, the Puerto Rican wetland frog or (Spanish: coquí llanero), is an endangered species of coqui, a frog species, endemic to Puerto Rico. It was discovered in 2005 by Neftalí Rios, and was named after Puerto Rican herpetologist Juan A. Rivero, in honor of his contributions to Puerto Rican herpetology.
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Dwarf coqui


The dwarf coqui or elfin coqui (Eleutherodactylus unicolor, in Spanish coquí duende ) is a species of frog endemic to Puerto Rico. It is placed in the subgenus Eleutherodactylus.
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Cricket coqui


The cricket coqui, green coqui, or coqui grillo (Eleutherodactylus gryllus ) is a species of frog in the family Eleutherodactylidae endemic to Puerto Rico.Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest.
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Hedrick’s coqui


Hedrick’s coqui, the treehole coqui, or coqui de Hedrick (Eleutherodactylus hedricki ) is a species of frog in the family Eleutherodactylidae endemic to Puerto Rico.Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest.
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Anolis cuvieri


Anolis cuvieri (Vernacular Spanish: lagarto verde, lagarto chipojo ; Vernacular English: Puerto Rican giant anole, Cuvier’s anole, green giant anole. ) is a species of lizard in the family Dactyloidae. The species is endemic to Puerto Rico, and is common in the Toro Negro State Forest.
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Monito gecko


The Monito gecko (Sphaerodactylus micropithecus ) is a lizard, a species of gecko endemic to the island of Monito, in the archipelago of Puerto Rico.
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Navassa curly-tailed lizard


The Navassa curly-tailed lizard or Navassa curlytail lizard (Leiocephalus eremitus ) is an extinct lizard species from the family of curly-tailed lizard (Leiocephalidae). It is known only from the one female specimen from which it was described in 1868. A second specimen which was collected by Rollo Beck in 1917 was identified as a Tiburon curly-tailed lizard (Leiocephalus melanochlorus ) by herpetologist Richard Thomas in 1966.
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Amphisbaena caeca


Amphisbaena caeca, commonly known as the Puerto Rican worm lizard or blind worm lizard, is a species of worm lizard endemic to Puerto Rico. These animals are vermicular reptiles that live under logs, rocks, and dirt. Other species of Amphisbaenids in the Caribbean include Amphisbaena bakeri, Amphisbaena fenestrata, Amphisbaena schmidti, Amphisbaena xera, and Cadea blanoides.Amphisbaenids are legless, worm-like reptiles with elongated bodies …
nearly uniform in diameter. They are covered with ring-like scales similar in appearance to earthworms. They are underground animals, hence the eyes have degenerated to tiny indistinct spots under the rings.
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Cochran’s croaking gecko


Cochran’s croaking gecko (Aristelliger cochranae ), also commonly known as Cochran’s Caribbean gecko and the Navassa gecko, is a species of lizard in the family Sphaerodactylidae. The species was described in 1931 by Chapman Grant and named after notable American herpetologist and artist Doris Mable Cochran. The species received one of its common names from the loud croaking call of the male during the mating period.
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Anolis poncensis


Anolis poncensis (commonly known as Ponce small-fanned anole, Ponce anole and dryland grass anole;) is a species of lizard of the family of Dactyloidae. The species is endemic to Puerto Rico. It was first identified in Ponce, in the hills three miles east of the city. The Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources considers it a «vulnerable species».
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Sphaerodactylus levinsi


Sphaerodactylus levinsi, also known commonly as the Desecheo gecko or the Isla Desecheo least gecko, is a species of lizard in the family Sphaerodactylidae. The species is endemic to Desecheo Island in Puerto Rico.
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Sphaerodactylus roosevelti


Sphaerodactylus roosevelti, also known commonly as Roosevelt’s beige sphaero or Roosevelt’s least gecko, is a small species of lizard in the family Sphaerodactylidae. The species is endemic to Puerto Rico.
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Sphaerodactylus nicholsi


Sphaerodactylus nicholsi, also known commonly as Nichols least gecko, Nichol’s dwarf sphaero or the Puerto Rican crescent sphaero, is a species of lizard in the family Sphaerodactylidae. The species is endemic to Puerto Rico.
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Sphaerodactylus gaigeae


Sphaerodactylus gaigeae, also known commonly as the chevronated sphaero or Gaige’s least gecko, is a species of lizard in the family Sphaerodactylidae. The species is endemic to Puerto Rico.
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Dwarf anole


The Puerto Rican Twig Anole or Dwarf Anole (Anolis occultus ) is a species of small, arboreal anole endemic to Puerto Rico and primarily inhabiting the Cordillera Central from the Sierra de Cayey range in the Southeast to the central-western ranges of Maricao. A mostly grey to olive-brown bodied lizard, A. occultus is the smallest of the Puerto Rican Anoles with a snout to vent length of 34-42 mm. In comparison to other twig anoles, A. occultus …
is extremely cryptic through its unique sleeping behaviors and mottled pattern. Sleeping behavior including site selection minimizes the probability of predator encounter along with A. occultus ’ extensive list of antipredator behaviors.
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The Best Places to see Wildlife in Puerto Rico & How to Get There

Jump to:
The wildlife of Puerto Rico
The best places to see wildlife in Puerto Rico
Tips for seeing wildlife in Puerto Rico
Conclusion

 

The wildlife of Puerto Rico

There is a seemingly endless amount of wildlife to see when you are in Puerto Rico, from exotic birds and bugs to monkeys and manatees. Some are native to Puerto Rico, while others were introduced by humans. However, they are all a rich part of the Puerto Rican landscape today.

Bats are the only native land-based mammals in Puerto Rico, and there are thirteen different species you can encounter while you are in Puerto Rico.

Non-native mammals, mammals that were introduced by people, include donkeys, pigs, horses and monkeys. The monkeys are primarily secluded to a small island off the coast of Puerto Rico called Cayo Santiago. The rest of these mammals are scattered throughout Puerto Rico.

Some of the most sought-after mammals in terms of sight-seeing are of the marine variety. The native marine mammals of Puerto Rico include manatees, dolphins and whales. The whales which are humpback whales and dolphins can be seen via several different sight-seeing tours which you can check out here.

The birds of Puerto Rico are probably the easiest to see of all the wildlife. There are so many types and they are all over the place. The types of birds you can see in Puerto Rico include: hummingbirds, bullfinches, owls, todys, mangos and more.

There are also a bunch of insects and reptiles in Puerto Rico. The insects of Puerto Rico include butterflies, spiders, scorpions, ants and mosquitos. The reptiles are limited to snakes, frogs and iguanas. These can generally be found in the more remote and natural environments such as the rainforest. However, it is possible to see one or two of these make their way to more populated areas. Be careful around these creatures, as some could be poisonous.
 

The best places to see wildlife in Puerto Rico

If you are interested in seeing any of the wildlife, you will likely need to venture out to different parts of Puerto Rico to do so.
These are the best places to see the wildlife in Puerto Rico:

  • Cayo Santiago – This is known as the island of monkeys in Puerto Rico. This is where most of the monkeys you can see are. The water around the island is shallow, so one of the better viewing experiences is to kayak around the island. Unfortunately, recent hurricanes have taken their toll on the island so the ability to actually get there for viewing might be impacted depending on when you go.

    As this is an island, you cannot get there by car. However, you can take an easy half hour-long kayak trip over to the island. You will be able to see some of the monkeys from your kayak.

  • El Yunque National Rainforest – Easily the best place in Puerto Rico to see the exotic birds and insects, the El Yunque National Rainforest is even a sight of its own. There are a ton of walking tours that you can take to see whatever you would like. Just be sure to research which walking tour will show you what you are particularly looking to see. Different tours go to different areas in the rainforest.

    Most people recommend driving to the rainforest yourself. You can get directions to do so here.

  • Guanica State Forest – You can see a variety of Puerto Rican wildlife in the Guanica State Forest. The environment is dry, so it is different from the rainforest for example. This is a great place to see various birds.

    You can drive to the rainforest and you can get directions here.

  • Rio Camuy Cave Park – Rio Camuy Cave Park is where you will be able to see the various different bats that dwell in Puerto Rico. The types of bats you can see include fruit bats, bulldog bats, brown bats and more.

    The cave park is located on the main island of Puerto Rico so you can drive there. You can find directions here.

  • Cueva Ventana – Another great place to see the various bats of Puerto Rico, Cueva Ventana is also home to several species of snakes and insects. True wildlife enthusiasts won’t want to miss this experience.

    The best way to get there is also by car. Its located just north of the Guanica State Forest, so you might want to consider catching both in the same day. You can get directions here.

 

Tips for seeing wildlife in Puerto Rico

  • Do not get too close – Some of the insects, such as spiders, might be poisonous. So be sure that you do not get so close that you could end up getting bitten.
  • Be quiet! – You won’t want to scare any of the wildlife off. Be sure that you remain as quiet as possible at all times so that you can avoid doing so.
  • Do not bring your dog – Dogs will scare other animals off, leave your pets at home when you go out to see wildlife.
  • Bring binoculars – With binoculars, you will be able to see animals from a distance without scaring or otherwise disturbing them.
  • Go out with a guide – Unless you are experienced at viewing wildlife in the specific area that you plan on visiting, you should get a guide of some sort who knows exactly where they are going and what they are doing.

 

Conclusion

Puerto Rico is a fantastic place to see some incredible wildlife. There are a bunch of great spots to check out the animals, birds and marine life.

It does help to have a car in Puerto Rico to get to most of these places. You can rent a car but that will limit you on where you can go and it could get costly pretty quickly. If you have a car in the United States, you can always ship your car to Puerto Rico with the help of the experts here at Puerto Rico car transport.

Unusual Wildlife Sanctuaries | More Amazing World

Many lesser-known wildlife sanctuaries are often overlooked in favor of well-known national parks, and sometimes it’s worth going a little further in the summer to see something new.

There are interesting and beautiful sites that provide a safe haven for countless species of endangered and endemic wildlife.

Vieques National Wildlife Refuge, Puerto Rico

One of the finest national wildlife sanctuaries in America, the Vieques National Wildlife Refuge is considered one of the most ecologically diverse in the Caribbean.

Home to endangered species such as the Antillean manatee and brown pelican, its habitats span coastal lagoons, montane forests and mangrove wetlands. There is a great opportunity to take the most picturesque wonderful photos. Definitely worth heading to the bioluminescent bay for a surreal nighttime canoe trip illuminated by the blue-green light of the micro-organisms that live in the water. nine0005

Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

Alaska is home to the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, where, unlike Vieques, temperatures can drop to below freezing during the winter months. Despite the difficult environment for some inhabitants (not all species live here all year round), this place is home to many hardy species that hibernate when snow covers the ground.

The best time of year to visit is April and May, when flocks of migratory birds arrive by the thousands, wintering wildlife emerges and salmon spawn. nine0005

Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, Oklahoma

Established in 1901, the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge is the oldest managed wildlife sanctuary in the United States in the network of protected fish and wildlife habitats. About 60,000 acres of mixed grasses, prairies, forests and rocks are inundated with native animals and plants.

In recent years, the focus has been on restoring species that have been extirpated from the area, so bison, elk, wild turkey, prairie dog, river otter and owls thrive here. nine0005

Savannah National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia

Savannah National Wildlife Refuge, composed of deciduous forests and intertidal freshwater swamps, is a vital link in a network of habitats. Providing vital nesting sites for a multitude of bird species including tree ducks, purple gallinules, bald eagles and ankhings.

There are numerous hiking and biking trails for visitors that pass through earthen dams, managed freshwater pools and all under the canopy of deciduous forest. nine0005

Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge

A complex of five individual reserves that span the coast of Maine, the Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge contains more than 73 offshore islands and four offshore sites that serve as protected habitats for nesting colonies sea ​​birds.

Considered nationally significant for the survival of endangered and endangered species, all five areas of the reserve are experiencing significant increases in bird populations. In order to see everything, it is better to take binoculars with you. nine0005

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  • animals in the wild
  • vertebrates
  • one animal
  • wood — material
  • gecko
  • day
  • no people
  • nature
  • nine0045 outdoors

  • side view
  • foreground focus
  • full length
  • tree
  • green
  • iguana
  • on the edge
  • tropical forest

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